Click map pin for location details


About Walking Fish Cooperative, CSF

Founded in 2009, we operate a community supported fishery in North Carolina. Based on the community-supported agriculture (CSA) model, a community supported fishery (CSF) is a program that connects local fishermen to a local market. CSF members pre-pay for a "season" of fresh, locally caught seafood, and in return fishermen provide a weekly share of premium fish or shellfish. CSFs seek to connect communities with their food system, encourage low-impact fishing practices, and build relationships between fishermen and community members.


Location Options
  • Community Supported Fishery/Seafood Box
Purchasing Options
  • Subscription
Delivery Options
  • In-Person Pick-Up
Ownership
  • Cooperative
  • Female
  • Fishing-Family

Visit Our Website

Seafood Offered

Black drum, Bluefish, Cobia, Flounder, Grouper, Hard clams, Mackerel, Oysters, Pompano, Sheepshead, Shrimp, Snapper, Speckled trout, Triggerfish, Tuna, Wahoo, Blue crabs

2

Locations

10

Number of Fishermen Sourced From

12

Years in Business

The value statements outlined below aim to create a higher level of accountability and trust, both internally within the network and externally to the public, in order to advance the movement of Community Supported Fisheries (CSF) and like-minded community-based seafood operations.

  • Community-Based Fisheries
  • Fair Access
  • Fair Price
  • Eating with the Ecosystem
  • Traceable and Simple Supply Chains
  • Catch and Handle with Honor
  • Community and Ecosystem Based Fisheries Management
  • Honoring the Ocean
  • Creativity and Collaboration

Read More

Our initiative borrows the concept of a triple bottom line from The Conservation Fund’s Resourceful Communities. The idea is simple: long-term solutions recognize the interconnectedness of ecological, economic, and socio-cultural systems.
Our Triple Bottom Line:
1 To increase the viability of traditional coastal communities by fostering economic opportunities that support natural resource-based livelihoods.
2 To cultivate healthy community ties within and between North Carolina’s rural and urban sectors.
3 To encourage an ethic of ecological stewardship that results in creative, community-based approaches to conservation.